Free Ride Bike Park

Today we checked out the Free Ride Bike Park, Oliver loves it and I was very impressed with it. Yesterday Tanya took Oliver out to the Free Ride bike park and Oli couldn’t stop talking about, so we took him there today. He has been riding a strider bike for just over a year now and he loves going to bike parks. Earlier this year we introduced Oli to the Cecelia Ravine bike park, which is really close to our house.

Location

The bike park is located just north of the Victoria airport, surrounded by trees, the little clearing is pretected from the wind. For us, the location stinks becuase it takes about 30 minutes to drive out there. The long distance also that we won’t be riding there like we do for the one at the Burnside Gorge bike park.

Park design

The Free Ride Bike Park has a number of differet paths/routes, which start with green and go up to double black. Each route is between 20 and 60m long and offer a combination of bumps, jumps and table tops. A couple of the routes are designed to work on your technical skills while others are build for catching air. There were two areas that are still under development, meaning that there will be more routes in the future.

the sign at the entrance of the park, shows the various routes.

The tracks looks like it is built with hard pack clayish material for the shape and that is covered with a silty fill for the routes. There is gravel for the walking path. You probably don’t want to see this place in the rain, I would imagine that it would be slipper and dangerious (think riding on snot).

the skill tuning section of the park, shaded from overhead trees.

There was a shaded picnick table with a water tap, so bring a water bottle. There is also a temporary outhouse there now, although it does look like they are building another structure, maybe this will be a washroom in the future.

More than I had as a kid

I don’t remember having something like this when I was a kid, although I did have easy access to a ski hill, there wasn’t a lot to do in the summer. Both Tanya and I are hoping that Oliver takes to the bike like a fish in water, and so far he seems to love riding his bike, especially the bike parks.

Posted from North Saanich, British Columbia, Canada
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Photo Wall

I have been wanting to do a photo wall since I moved into my current residence. I wanted to have a number of images from our travels displayed in a way that looked slightly elegant. With 7 simple frames from Ikea, a measuring tape and a level, I created a layout right about the main desk in our work area.

The Open Road

The theme for the photo wall is The Open Road and consists of the images that Tanya and I took while traveling. Since so many of our travels have been by bike, we wanted to show the less glamorous part of towns and cities we saw on and off the bicycle. These photos span many countries, including

  • Nepal
  • India
  • Cambodia
  • Mexico

Black and white and theme

I have to give Tanya full credit the theme and the choice by using black and white. Black and white photos are much easier to fit together and make the wall look classy (or at least not tacky as would be the case if I used colour photos). The theme Tanya came up with was brilliant. This theme allowed us to showcase photos that we don’t usually look at by bring back great memories of our travels.

Posted from New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada
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Our Favs in Portland

Portland is a fun place. Both Tanya and I love this place, and why not, it has all the stuff we love, cyclo-culture, amazing beer, foodie options, cool districts, chilled out just enough and just a little rough around the edges to make it interesting.

This isn’t an extensive list, we only had two days in Portland and one day was July 4th (everything was closed). These were our favorite activities.

  1. Rent bikes, if you have a little ones, go Dutch with Clever Cycles
  2. Get away from the heat in Forest Park
  3. Buy a baguette from Ken’s artisan bread and and fill it with goods from City Market
  4. Go to Hop Works Bike Bar
  5. Eat a Swedish breakfast at Broder, show up early to avoid a line
  6. Check out Alberta Street
  7. Eat ice cream from Salt and Straw
  8. Check out some of the many farmers markets
  9. Drink coffee in one of the cafes and think up skits for the next season of Portlandia

Other options?

Tanya and I are foodies and our travels usually have a food and drink spin, so if that isn’t your thing, download a copy of Travel Portland Magazine for many more options of what to see, do, and eat. 

Posted from Portland, Oregon, United States
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Life through the screen

Life through the screen

I am not really sure when it happened, but all of a sudden we seem to living life through the screen. I am not saying this is a bad thing, nor is it a good thing, it just is what we (and possibly you) do. Documenting out lives through photos, tweets, status updates and sms, this is the 21st century.

Is it really that different?

I would argue that people have been tracking their lives as long as there have been tools to do so. From writing journals to making photo albums to what we do now, we have always wanted to document our experiences. Our brains are hardwired to forget trivial information and experiences, but that doesn’t mean that we want to forget them. 

This is to remembering (or documenting) the trivial, and not so trivial experiences.

Posted from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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Tasting at Wild Rose Brewery

While visiting friends in Calgary, we went to Wild Rose Brewery for lunch. I decided to order the sample pack and taste the beers that Wild Rose Brewery produces. Here are my favorites (and not so favorites).

The good

  • S.O.B. is a slightly bitter and friendly session ale. This is the perfect drink for a weekend afternoon.
  • HooDoo Hef is really nice. A well balanced hefeweizen with character, interesting, slightly sweet, and with the promised clove flavour. There is a slight banana flavour as well. Great mouth feel, great beer. This is a seasonal brew and is one of my favorites.
  • Wred Wheat is a good amber ale, balanced, interesting, dependable and something that you could drink all night.
  • The Brown ale is chocolatey and malty, delicious and another great beer by Wild Rose Brewery.

The not so good 

  • Velvet fog is boring, no flavour stands out, and this unfiltered beer looks more interesting then it tastes. The beer does have great mouth feel, but not worth experiencing twice.
  • The IPA is a little off, I can’t put my finger on it, but it just isn’t like the IPAs from Victoria and Vancouver.
  • Alberta Crude has a great start, complex flavours, a smooth beginning and a great middle, however, the finish doesn’t live up to the start. A bitter note near the end leaves you a little confused, and you wonder what happened to the great start.

Final thoughts

Wild rose has a full line of beers with great variety. There are some real treats (Wred Wheat and Brown Ale). The seasonal is fun and interesting, definitely showing you that the brew master knows how to make new and interesting beers.

Posted from Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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The end of the big T

Tanya cycling through India

T is for Thailand, but it is also for Tropics. As our time here in Thailand end, so does our trip. For the past 10 months we have spent all of our time in the tropic, from the northern Thailand, northern Vietnam and middle of India. We have also been in the far south, in Singapore nearly straddling the equator. We have seen the season (hot, hotter and wet), and although hot season was hot when we arrived, it is now cold. Hotter is still hot and wet is wet. Torrential downpours have caused small streams to fill paths, make roads more like river instead of roads, and have transformed the landscape from yellow to bright green. The lethargic hot weather makes any task difficult.

Learning at the PDC

Taking our PDC in Malaysia during the hot season was tough, I remember laying on the cement trying to cool down. I also remember working on Grassroots farm during this hot period, hoping for rain just to keep cool. I also remember when it would get cold at night in Hampie and Dalat, having to wear a sweater and a toque (who knew?)

New tastes, Durian, the King of Fruit

We both embarked on this trip in hopes to see something different, and experience something different. Riding a bicycle through India was a great way to achieve this goal. We also wanted to get inspired, thanks to places like Sadhana forest and the Panya project we are inspired. But also to our PDC teachers and everyone else we have met along the way. We have learned so much on this trip. We have learned:

  • How to build with mud

  • How to make kimchi

  • How to make wine

  • How to live in a community

    Learning about biodynamics

  • The best way to find ones way around rural India

  • How to grow food

  • How to cook without a cook book

  • How to cook for a hundred people

  • How to make various Biodynamic perperations

It was damn cold in Dalat

I know there is so much more as well. I never thought that I could get sick of traveling, and although I’m not sick of traveling, I am ready to come home. There is so much I want to try, there is so much I want to do and I’m looking forward to doing it.

SE Asia is full of culture and history

I want to thank all the loyal readers of this blog, we appreciate you dedication and patients. The last couple of months have been pretty inactive (in terms of blog posts). Since the beginning of this trip there has been more then 16,000 views on grannygear, which is pretty amazing, so we thank you all for your support. For those that we met on the road, maybe one day our paths will cross and we can catch up. For the rest of you back home, we are looking forward to meeting up people we haven’t seen in about a year and just chillin. See you soon.

Odd jobs at Panya

Hand made Bougainville Bongophone

Panya has been a great learning environment because of the variety. Along with all that I have learned, I have also discovered that I enjoy working with wood. After watching the movie Coconut Revolution, Sam and I got the crazy idea to build and Bougainville Bongophone. It sounds complex, but it isn’t. All you need is some bamboo. You cut everyone to a different length and you get a great (and kind cartoony) sound. Sam and I worked on this project for three days, mostly cutting and chiseling. This is the parts that I enjoyed, I now want to make a Cajon when I get back home. We learned a tough lesson though, when trying to make something out of bamboo, make sure it is dried (yellow not green). When it dries, it tends to crack, which is what happened to us, and as such, our instrument no longer works.

you hit this side with some flip flops to make the noise

If one remember from a few posts ago, we got the idea of making a tree nursery, which required us to level some land…by hand. Leveling by hand took some time (and energy), but it was good.

Kelly and Sam discussing where we should shave down to make the site level


Tanya and Sam moving sand and gravel

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After that we had to move 6m3 of gravel and sand (once again by hand). The piles of material were all placed around the leveled area evenly. The next step was to make a well in the middle of the pile.

Some of the piles, ready for cement and water


Smoothing (you can use bamboo or pvc piping)

In the well cement and water was mixed with the surrounding material to make a mix and then we spread the mix out evenly. You repeat this a few more times and you have a super easy flat surface. This mix was ultra wet so it would self level, and the goal was to make all with a piece of bamboo (that didn’t work out for us). In the end the concrete dried, and although it isn’t super posh, it is pretty nice (considering it was done in 2 hours with 7 people that have never done it before). The next step is to put up wall and a roof and we got ourselves a weed free nursery.

Kelly working on some finishing

Kelly working on some finishing

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First of four levels that will makes up the walls

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Trip to Pae, unaware of the demise of Dam (the dog)

On a less possitive note, one of the dogs dies while we were on holiday. Panya being permaculture, we thought the best way to remember Dam (the dead dog) was to put her into a 18 day compost pile. There is a video of this happening.[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY4pRB0vr4M]

One of the most important things I learned at Panya was how easy it is to do things. Things I always thought a professional needed to do, one can do oneself. Just do it. You want a nursery, build it; you want a musical instrument, build it; you want hoot water, build a solar water heater, you want a solar bread oven, build it.

Posted from Ban Pao, Chiang Mai, Thailand
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The Panya Project

Grass, some cut, some not

Somewhere north of Chaing Mai, lost in the complex networks of roads, back roads, canals and rice paddies there is a place called the Panya Project. The Panya Project started about 3 years ago, it is about 10 acres of 5 year old mango plantation. Over the past three years, this mono-culture plantation has been transformed into a small community in which people come here to spend some time, plant some veggies, harvest some fruit and have a good time.

After the grass has been cut

The main part of the mango plantation is about to undergo a major transformation though. That is where Tanya and I fit in. We are long term volunteers, here to help plant thousand of trees in amongst the mango trees. We are turning this difficult to maintain one fruit crop into a multicrop forest of food. Instead of one season in which you can harvest fruit, fruit will be available all year. Two swales and a dam (or a reservoir, the Aussies like to call them dams), are on site to help keep this place green in the dry times of the year (however it is not currently working perfectly yet).

The sunseting from our mud brick hut

Moving into our place at Panya

Baby trees (aka seedlings), waiting to be planted out in the food forest

The rainy season is a time for plants to grow. In the past 1.5 months grass and vine have taken over the site. The job over the past week has been preparing the site so that we can plant some trees. This has involved cutting grass with a brush cutter, pulling vines off of trees, weeding the veggie gardens, maintaining the nursery and much more. It is amazing the transformation that has taken place, now the plantation looks like a well maintained orchard, but at several man days of work already put in (and it would have to be done every three weeks), finding a new system to use this land would be best. The food forest should be able to maintain itself much better then the mono-culture that is there now.

Posted from Ban Pao, Chiang Mai, Thailand
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Chiang Mai

For those of you that have been check often, I thank you. We have been lazy these past few days, not seeing too many sights in Chiang Mai, and as a result, not blogging too much. I’m sorry to report that it will probably be more of the same in the coming months. We will be heading up to the Panya Project on Saturday. We will be spending about 2 months there volunteering at the permaculture project. I expect that the posts will slow down even more. We will be coming back to Canada at the end of September, which means we are on the final leg of our journey.

Enough of that though, Chiang Mai is great. This city is pretty small, somewhat historic and filled with good food and many temples. Since we have been here we have seen a handful of Buddhist temples (they all look pretty similar to me now), went to the Sunday night market, rented a tandem bicycle, got our visas extended, I had a 24 hour bout of food poisoning, and Tanya has been going to some yoga classes.

The food here has been great, from traditional Thai food to modern pizza, you can have many tasty meals here. One of my favorites have been the ripe mango on sticky rice. The mango is sweet and ripe (they don’t taste like this back home), and the rice is slightly salty, slightly sticky. It’s a great combination, combine that with an orange juice and a coffee, it is a great way to start the morning (only 1 Canadian dollar, perfect). There is lots of other food in this town as well, too many to name, all are cheap and tasty though.

Mango and Sticky Rice

The Sunday night market is not an event to be missed. A couple of intersecting streets, about 1km long each all provide thousands of people with something to do on Sunday night. Hundreds of stands lite by bright compact fluorescent lights sell all sorts of stuff. From trinkets to t-shirts there are stalls selling almost anything. The real treasure is the food however. For 10 bhat (25 cents) you can get a big spring roll, or Pad Thai, or fresh juice or any other number of great fare. The food is spicy and the atmosphere is electric. It was great fun, and after walking the market Tanya and I wondering why our grocery/big box/small box stores give us such an un-inspiring bland experience.

Tandem Bicycle

One day we found a tandem bicycle that you can rent. If you remember, we rented a really old, poorly made one in Da Lat, Vietnam. The one here was much nicer then the one in Da Lat. We rented it and headed out of town. We first had to get out of the city though and that was somewhat stressful. Although Thailand traffic isn’t the worst traffic around (like India or Vietnam), maneuvering a tandem makes everything a little more challenging. We did get out of town and it was great, the scenery was filled with green fields, a brown river and smiling faces. As many people would wave, smile or honk their horn at us, we felt that same feeling we felt back in India. It was great, and it really made us start to miss our cycle touring days. By the looks on the faces of the local Thia’s we passed, they don’t see tourists very often, never mind two on the same bike, pedaling in perfect sync. To me, that is what makes traveling great, making someone smile.

After a tiring 3.5 hour ride we headed back. We walked back to our hotel, tired and stiff (we haven’t been doing much exercise lately). Renting bikes are great, seeing the rural area is great, doing both at the same time is perfect. After spending the last couple of month backpacking, I know that having your own two wheeled mode of transportation is the best. You get off the main track, you see things other don’t and you have a great time. Although our trip isn’t done yet, I feel I have learned a great deal in the past 8 months: bicycles are fun, rural areas are nice (especially in the morning), having some meaning to your traveling makes things much more rewarding and 99.9% of the time, people are nice and helpful.

Posted from Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
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Thailand

Thailand

We have now arrived in Thailand. We got here a couple days ago. Before coming here I didn’t know what to think of this place. Most people who backpack SE Asia come here. I know there are a lot of beaches and that the food is delicious.

These patterns were on all the doors of the Wat

When you have been on the road for 8 months, things don’t really shock you as much. Nor are you as impressed as much. One thing that was amazing was how nice this place is for backpackers. There is a couple of streets lined with cheap t-shirts, cheap food, cheap beer, cheap CDs, cheap books and cheap fake driver’s licenses. The streets are full of street food. You can get a really good cheap meal just about anywhere, and there are all sorts of meat being shown for display on the side of the road. The streets are a little dirty (but not as bad as some places), the traffic is nice to pedestrians, and there are a fraction of the motorcycles there were in Vietnam.

Buddha Statues

Nearby our area is the Grand Palace, the Emerald Buddha and Wat Pho. One day we went to see all three. However the price of the Grand Palace and the Emerald Buddha where a little to expensive for us. One thing that really bothers us is how much palaces charge to see them. It is not like the royal family really needs the money. I think the problem lies with the fact that people will pay it. As long as people are willing to pay to go in, a couple of cheap backpackers are not really going to make much of a difference.

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Big sleeping Buddha

After the trip to the gates of the Grand Palace and the Emerald Buddha we headed to the Wat Pho. The Wat Pho is a pretty big complex, the entrance price was reasonable and we enjoyed ourselves. In the days since that we haven’t been doing to much. Just killing time before we start our internship at the Panya Project, you will get more on that later. Tomorrow we will be in Chang Mai (northern Thailand).

Posted from Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand
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